The Hitler I Knew

The Hitler I Knew

The Memoirs of the Third Reich's Press Chief

Book - 2010
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Baker & Taylor
Adolf Hitler's press chief and close companion describes the personality of the leader of the Third Reich along with insights into the events of the Second World War.

Norton Pub
“Up to the last moment, his overwhelming, despotic authority aroused false hopes and deceived his people and his entourage. Only at the end, when I watched the inglorious collapse and the obstinacy of his final downfall, was I able suddenly to fit together the bits of mosaic I had been amassing for twelve years into a complete picture of his opaque and sphinx like personality. If my contemporaries fail to understand me, those who came after will surely profit from this account.”—Otto Dietrich

When Otto Dietrich was invited in 1933 to become Adolf Hitler’s press chief, he accepted with the simple uncritical conviction that Adolf Hitler was a great man, dedicated to promoting peace and welfare for the German people. At the end of the war, imprisoned and disillusioned, Otto Dietrich sat down to write what he had seen and heard in twelve years of the closest association with Hitler, requesting that it be published after his death.

Dietrich’s role placed him in a privileged position. He was hired by Hitler in 1933, was his confidant until 1945, and he worked—and clashed—with Joseph Goebbels. His direct, personal experience of life at the heat of the Reich makes for compelling reading.


“Up to the last moment, his overwhelming, despotic authority aroused false hopes and deceived his people and his entourage. Only at the end, when I watched the inglorious collapse and the obstinacy of his final downfall, was I able suddenly to fit together the bits of mosaic I had been amassing for twelve years into a complete picture of his opaque and sphinxlike personality. If my contemporaries fail to understand me, those who came after will surely profit from this account.” —Otto Dietrich

When Otto Dietrich was invited in 1933 to become Adolf Hitler’s press chief, he accepted with the simple uncritical conviction that Adolf Hitler was a great man, dedicated to promoting peace and welfare for the German people. At the end of the war, imprisoned and disillusioned, Otto Dietrich sat down to write what he had seen and heard in twelve years of the closest association with Hitler, requesting that it be published after his death.
Dietrich’s role placed him in a privileged position. He was hired by Hitler in 1933, was his confidant until 1945, and he worked—and clashed—with Joseph Goebbels. His direct, personal experience of life at the heat of the Reich makes for compelling reading.

Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.


Book News
This memoir, previously unavailable to American readers and first published in 1955 by Otto Dietrich, Hitler's press chief and confidant from 1933 to 1945, was written after World War II while he was imprisoned. In it, Dietrich reveals his disillusionment and attempts to explain Hitler's personality to the German people and warn against future leaders who might seduce them, calling Hitler a megalomaniac and "mentally abnormal" and detailing his shortcomings, anti-intellectual prejudice, bigotry, and popularity, as well as his foreign policy during the war, lack of defensive military strategy, and miscellaneous anecdotes and observations. He does not discuss his own complicity in the war, or mention the Holocaust. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell Publishing
“Up to the last moment, his overwhelming, despotic authority aroused false hopes and deceived his people and his entourage. Only at the end, when I watched the inglorious collapse and the obstinacy of his final downfall, was I able suddenly to fit together the bits of mosaic I had been amassing for twelve years into a complete picture of his opaque and sphinx like personality. If my contemporaries fail to understand me, those who came after will surely profit from this account.”—Otto Dietrich

When Otto Dietrich was invited in 1933 to become Adolf Hitler’s press chief, he accepted with the simple uncritical conviction that Adolf Hitler was a great man, dedicated to promoting peace and welfare for the German people. At the end of the war, imprisoned and disillusioned, Otto Dietrich sat down to write what he had seen and heard in twelve years of the closest association with Hitler, requesting that it be published after his death.

Dietrich’s role placed him in a privileged position. He was hired by Hitler in 1933, was his confidant until 1945, and he worked—and clashed—with Joseph Goebbels. His direct, personal experience of life at the heat of the Reich makes for compelling reading.

Publisher: New York, NY : Skyhorse Pub., c2010.
ISBN: 9781602399723
1602399727
Branch Call Number: 943.086092 DIE
Characteristics: xiii, 242 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.

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AQUILEA777
Jul 12, 2019

A shrewd assessment of Hitler by one who knew him well. Dietrich blames Hitler's indiscipline and blunders for losing the War. He especially faults Hitler's failure to forge a true alliance with the defeated French against the USSR; Hitler said it would alienate Mussolini, who would prove worthless. (The last troops to hold the Soviets back from Hitler's bunker were French volunteers of the Charlemagne Division, a fact that only added to Hitler's depression.)

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